Unveiling the Titanic's Depth: 5 Critical Mistakes Leading to the Submersible Implosion 

Source: CreativeCommons

The missing Titan submersible's implosion resulted in the presumed deaths of the five passengers on board, raising questions about safety measures.

Source: CreativeCommons

OceanGate, the sub's operator, faced criticism for its approach to safety, which preceded the doomed mission to the Titanic wreckage.

Source: CreativeCommons

Safety concerns regarding the design and operation of the sub were ignored or dismissed, leading to the catastrophic explosion.

Source: CreativeCommons

The sub's unconventional use of carbon fiber for the hull instead of stronger materials like steel or titanium raised safety issues.

Source: CreativeCommons

The early-warning system designed to detect hull failures was considered ineffective, providing minimal warning before an implosion.

Source: CreativeCommons

OceanGate resisted calls to certify the sub, potentially indicating it didn't pass industry-standard safety testing.

Source: CreativeCommons

Staff members who raised safety concerns were dismissed or ignored, suggesting a disregard for addressing critical issues.

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Previous safety incidents, such as battery issues and getting lost, highlight a history of problems with OceanGate's submersibles.

Source: CreativeCommons

The lack of an emergency location transmitter (ELT) further compromised safety measures onboard the sub.

Source: CreativeCommons